Sir Ranulph Fiennes faces next summit challenge

05 January 2017:  Less than a month after his last mountain ascent, Sir Ranulph Fiennes has set out to climb Aconcagua, the highest peak in South America.

The veteran explorer and fundraiser is well on his way to becoming the first person to cross both polar ice caps and climb the highest mountain on every continent. His Global Reach Challenge is raising money for cancer charity Marie Curie.

Sir Ranulph Fiennes using Inmarsat equipment. Sir Ranulph Fiennes climbing Mount Vinson, Antarctica, December 2016 as part of the  Global Reach Challenge raising money for Marie Curie. Sponsors for the project are TMF, Paul Sykes and Inmarsat.

Sir Ranulph Fiennes using Inmarsat equipment. Sir Ranulph Fiennes climbing Mount Vinson, Antarctica, December 2016 as part of the Global Reach Challenge raising money for Marie Curie. Sponsors for the project are TMF, Paul Sykes and Inmarsat.

Sir Ranulph and his climbing team are making good use of Inmarsat satellite equipment throughout the challenge. They carry two robust IsatPhone 2 satellite phones and use IsatHub, Inmarsat’s smart device connectivity service, to keep in touch with the rest of the support team and transmit photos.

Live interviews

Fieldcraft Studios, the production company working with Sir Ranulph, is relying on BGAN HDR for live interviews on the BBC during climbs.

Sir Ranulph has already reached the North and South Poles by crossing the Antarctic continent and the Arctic Ocean (1982), and climbed Mount Everest in Asia (2009), Mount Kilimanjaro in Africa (2004) and Mount Elbrus, the highest mountain in Europe, and Mount Vinson in Antarctica in 2016.

Following his ascent of 6,962-metre (22,840 ft) Mount Aconcagua in Argentina, he is due to climb Mount Carstensz in New Guinea, and Denali, the highest peak in North America and one of the world’s most dangerous and difficult mountains to climb.

 

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